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Dr. SAMUEL RAMSEY on Bee Population in Peril /210

For The Wild

Science & Medicine

In the mid-2000s, estimates in the United States suggested that we were losing up to 40% of honeybee colonies. The phenomenon of Colony Collapse Disorder was widely covered in the media as the next emerging threat, but then it all but disappeared. Beyond these headlines, we never heard much follow up as to how bee populations were faring. This week we return to the bees with entomologist Dr. Samuel Ramsey. Highlighting the intertwining issues of poor nutrition, pesticides, and parasites, Dr. Ramsey also shares how climate change impacts the nutritional quality of pollen and how human design and development has strengthened and spread parasitic mites to the disadvantage of bees globally. Samuel Ramsey earned his doctorate from Dr. Dennis van Engelsdorp’s lab at the University of Maryland; Dr. Ramsey maintains a focus on how insect research can benefit the public through the development of IPM strategies and STEM-based outreach initiatives. Music featured in this episode is “Beanstalk” by Jeff Parker, “Natural Harmony” by The Mysterious They, and “Saka” by Gabriella di Capua. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.


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