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Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

48 episodes

Nov 23, 2020

Episode 64: Adopting A Steady State Economy To Protect Wild Nature With Brian Czech 

About Brian Czech
Brian Czech is the founding president of the Center For The Advancement Of The Steady State Economy (
CASSE). Czech served as the first conservation biologist in the history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 1999-2017, and concurrently as a visiting professor of natural resource economics in Virginia Tech’s National Capitol Region.
He is the author of several books including Supply Shock, Shoveling Fuel for a Runaway Train, and The Endangered Species Act: History, Conservation Biology, and Public Policy, as well as over 50 academic journal articles. His primary contributions to ecological economics pertain to the “trophic” origins of money, the process of technological progress, and the political “steady state revolution.”
Czech is a frequent speaker, moderator, commentator, and regular contributor to the Steady State Herald. He has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin, an M.S. from the University of Washington, and a Ph.D. from the University of Arizona.

“A steady state economy is an economy of stable or mildly fluctuating size. The term typically refers to a national economy, but it can also be applied to a local, regional, or global economy. An economy can reach a steady state after a period of growth or after a period of downsizing or degrowth. To be sustainable, a steady state economy may not exceed ecological limits.” -From CASSE’s Steady State Economy Definition page
Topics

* How can a steady state economy help restore and protect wild nature and biodiversity?
* How to put population and immigration into perspective in order to have a civil discussion.
* Steady state GDP and what that looks like.
* The basic truth that economic growth fundamentally conflicts with environmental protection.

Extra Credit

* Visit CASSE to learn more and sign the petition of support for SSE.

About Brian Czech
Brian Czech is the founding president of the Center For The Advancement Of The Steady State Economy (CASSE). Czech served as the first conservation biologist in the history of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from 1999-2017, and concurrently as a visiting professor of natural resource economics in Virginia Tech’s National Capitol Region.
He is the author of several books including Supply Shock, Shoveling Fuel for a Runaway Train, and The Endangered Species Act: History, Conservation Biology, and Public Policy, as well as over 50 academic journal articles. His primary contributions to ecological economics pertain to the “trophic” origins of money, the process of technological progress, and the political “steady state revolution.”
Czech is a frequent speaker, moderator, commentator, and regular contributor to the Steady State Herald. He has a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin, an M.S. from the University of Washington,

Oct 28, 2020

Episode 63: Jack Loeffler on Rewilding Human Consciousness and Tales From An Extraordinary Life 

About Jack Loeffler
With the temperament of Santa Claus and the tenacity of a badger, Jack Loeffler reveals his compassion and concern for Southwestern traditional cultures and their respective habitats in the wake of Manifest Destiny. Working both as an individual and with comrades—including Edward Abbey and Gary Snyder—he was part of an early coterie of counterculturalists and environmentalists who fought to thwart the plunder of natural resources in the Southwest. Loeffler, a former jazz musician, fire lookout, museum curator, bioregionalist, and self-taught aural historian, shares his humor and imagination, his adventures, observations, reflections, and meditations along the trail in
his retelling of a life well lived. He advises each and every one of us to go skinny-dipping joyfully in the flow of Nature to better understand where we’re headed.
Acclaim For “Headed Into The Wind”
“Over these pages, we relive Loeffler’s life and learn why he might honestly come to the title of America’s most interesting and thoughtful man.”—Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave
Topics

* Re-naturalizing human consciousness
* Counterculture, beat generation, bohemian culture
* Ed Abbey, Gary Snyder, Alan Watts, Stewart Brand
* Federal vs grassroots vs self governance
* Zen, Taoism
* “Nature Abhors A Maximum”
* “If you look at nature and don’t see yourself in it, you’re too far away.”
* The Song of the Leaf Cutter Ant
* Culture is shaped by the habitat that sprouts it

Extra Credit
Listen to this 54 minute podcast of a radio program Jack produced regarding Aldo Leopold in the Southwest that was broadcast over Public Radio in 2009

* Aldo Leopold and the Emerging Land Ethic

PBS interview from last year with Lorene Mills

Books by Jack Loeffler:

 
 
 
 
 
2013 Quivira Conference, Gary Snyder & Jack Loeffler

About Jack Loeffler
With the temperament of Santa Claus and the tenacity of a badger, Jack Loeffler reveals his compassion and concern for Southwestern traditional cultures and their respective habitats in the wake of Manifest Destiny. Working both as an individual and with comrades—including Edward Abbey and Gary Snyder—he was part of an early coterie of counterculturalists and environmentalists who fought to thwart the plunder of natural resources in the Southwest. Loeffler, a former jazz musician, fire lookout, museum curator, bioregionalist, and self-taught aural historian, shares his humor and imagination, his adventures, observations, reflections, and meditations along the trail in his retelling of a life well lived. He advises each and every one of us to go skinny-dipping joyfully in the flow of Nature to better understand where we’re headed.
Acclaim For “Headed Into The Wind”
“Over these pages, we relive Loeffler’s life and learn why he might honestly come to the title of America’s most interesting and thoughtful man.”—Sean Prentiss, author of Finding Abbey: The Search for Edward Abbey and His Hidden Desert Grave
Topics

* Re-naturalizing human consciousness
* Counterculture, beat generation,

Oct 14, 2020

Episode 62: Why Hunting Is Not Conservation With Kevin Bixby 

About Kevin
As the son of a naval officer, Kevin grew up all over the world, but the American West has always been home. While attending high school in Oakland, he began his activist career by volunteering at the Berkeley Ecology Center. After graduating with a B.A. in biology from Dartmouth College in 1978, he returned to the San Francisco Bay Area and began volunteering at Friends of the Earth where he rubbed elbows with the late, great David Brower.
Working to save condors and whales by day, he made a living by driving a San Francisco taxicab at night. Realizing that more education might be useful, Kevin set off to the School of Natural Resources at the University of Michigan in 1985, where he earned a Master’s degree in Natural Resources Policy. But the West beckoned, and in 1988 Kevin moved to New Mexico with his future wife, Lisa LaRocque, and started the
Southwest Environmental Center in 1991.
Topics

* How wildlife management by states is controlled special interests and how to protect biodiversity rather than game and introduced species on public lands
* Follow the money: state game and fish departments are primarily funded with hunting and fishing licenses, effectively locking out public interest in favor of a minority
* How you can make a change in your state

Extra Credit
Read Kevin’s article: “Why Hunting Isn’t Conservation And Why It Matters
Visit Southwest Environmental Center
About Kevin
As the son of a naval officer, Kevin grew up all over the world, but the American West has always been home. While attending high school in Oakland, he began his activist career by volunteering at the Berkeley Ecology Center. After graduating with a B.A. in biology from Dartmouth College in 1978, he returned to the San Francisco Bay Area and began volunteering at Friends of the Earth where he rubbed elbows with the late, great David Brower.
Working to save condors and whales by day, he made a living by driving a San Francisco taxicab at night. Realizing that more education might be useful, Kevin set off to the School of Natural Resources at the University of Michigan in 1985, where he earned a Master’s degree in Natural Resources Policy. But the West beckoned, and in 1988 Kevin moved to New Mexico with his future wife, Lisa LaRocque, and started the Southwest Environmental Center in 1991.
Topics

* How wildlife management by states is controlled special interests and how to protect biodiversity rather than game and introduced species on public lands
* Follow the money: state game and fish departments are primarily funded with hunting and fishing licenses, effectively locking out public interest in favor of a minority
* How you can make a change in your state

Extra Credit
Read Kevin’s article: “Why Hunting Isn’t Conservation And Why It Matters
Visit Southwest Environmental Center

Oct 1, 2020

Episode 61: Dennis Sizemore from Round River Conservation Studies 

About
Dennis holds a BS from New Mexico State University in Wildlife Science and an MS from the University of Montana in Wildlife Ecology. His 40 years of conservation work experience includes law enforcement, management, education, and research. Dennis is a former President of The Wildlands Project and currently serves as Vice President of the Taku-Atlin Conservancy and as a board member of the Pax Natura Foundation.
I met Dennis Sizemore in 1995 at the Black Range Lodge situated on the edge of the Gila Wilderness. It was the beginning of the Sky Island Wildland Network Design project. I have always thought of Dennis as someone with the coolest job in the world. In 1991 he co-founded of
Round River Conservation Studies, and has served as the organization’s executive director since then.
Nearing 30 years of operation, Round River Conservation Studies has been responsible for varying degrees of protection and vastly greater understanding of millions of acres of wildands and countless species who make their homes there. 30 years of undergrad students getting an experience of a lifetime while doing field work many said couldn’t be done properly by undergrads. All over the world.
Today I talk with Dennis about his work with Round River, sharing local wine and Kudu steak in the African bush with Michael Soule, and vital conservation efforts in many of the locations around the globe where Round River operates.
Topics

* Carrying out Michael Soule’s mission with every Round River field study
* Working in Botswana on wildlife issues, community relations, and conservation work
* The value of a Round River experience for undergrads (It’s WILD!)
* When you should come out of your tent in the morning when elephants are in your camp (the answer might not surprise you!)

Extra Credit

* Visit Round River Conservation Studies
* Round River YouTube Channel
* Where RR Works
* Student Programs

About
Dennis holds a BS from New Mexico State University in Wildlife Science and an MS from the University of Montana in Wildlife Ecology. His 40 years of conservation work experience includes law enforcement, management, education, and research. Dennis is a former President of The Wildlands Project and currently serves as Vice President of the Taku-Atlin Conservancy and as a board member of the Pax Natura Foundation.
I met Dennis Sizemore in 1995 at the Black Range Lodge situated on the edge of the Gila Wilderness. It was the beginning of the Sky Island Wildland Network Design project. I have always thought of Dennis as someone with the coolest job in the world. In 1991 he co-founded of Round River Conservation Studies, and has served as the organization’s executive director since then.
Nearing 30 years of operation, Round River Conservation Studies has been responsible for varying degrees of protection and vastly greater understanding of millions of acres of wildands and countless species who make their homes there. 30 years of undergrad students getting an experience of a lifetime while doing field work many said couldn’t be done properly by undergrads. All over the world.
Today I talk with Dennis about his work with Round River, sharing local wine and Kudu steak in the African bush with Michael Soule, and vital conservation efforts in many of the locations around the globe where Round River operates.
Topics

* Carrying out Michael Soule’s mission with every Round River field study
* Working in Botswana on wildlife issues, community relations,

Sep 19, 2020

Episode 60: Don Waller and Bob Boucher on the Upper Midwest Superior Bio-Conservancy 

About Don and Bob
Don Waller is a forest ecologist, conservation biologist and evolutionary biologist who taught ecology, evolution, and conservation biology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison as the J.T. Curtis Professor until 2019.
His research interests include the causes and consequences of inbreeding, the evolution of mating systems and life histories, rare plant demography and genetics, and the forces driving long-term forest community change. These include habitat fragmentation, climate change, aerial N deposition, invasive species, and deer browsing and other impacts.
Dr Waller co-authored Wild Forests: Conservation Biology and Public Policy (Island Press 1994) and The Vanishing Present: Shifts in Wisconsin’s lands, waters, and wildlife (Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008) as well as over 160 papers and book chapters.
He chairs the Science Advisory Council for the midwestern
Environmental Law and Policy Center. He serves on the Rewilding Leadership Council and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
Bob Boucher has a MS in Water Resource Management from the UW Madison with an emphasis in ecosystem management of watersheds. He studies landscape ecology and is an advisor to the Beaver Institute.
​He was the founder of Milwaukee Riverkeeper and is the retired Executive Director of the Cedar Lakes Conservation Foundation, Wisconsin’s oldest land trust. Bob has traveled to over 60 countries, exploring wild and tame places.
He has worked in Alaska as a fishing, kayak and naturalist guide and led wilderness trips for Camp Manito-Wish. He is a member of the Birch Leggings club and has summited Denali. Bob and his wife Mary share a love of nature, wildlife, hiking, biking, skiing, their home, organic gardening and their dogs.
Superior Bio-Preserve Map

Topics

* Acheiving 50% protection in upper midwest by 2050
* A giant 33,000 square mile wildlands network
* The importance of indian tribes in policy and coalition building
* Elevating the land ethics of how people live on the planet: stewardship vs extraction model
* Heavy, non-compatible logging going on in upper midwest, the “paperbasket” of the United States.

Extra Credit
Visit: Superior Bio-Conservancy
Read: The North American Wildlands Network: Four Megalinkages
Further info focused on Don’s research:

* Faculty spotlight: Don Waller, steward of Wisconsin forests
* Wisconsin Plant Ecology Laboratory
* Research Gate Profile
* Talk at Humboldt University, Berlin, on long-term ecological change

Deer in the upper Midwest:

* Why hunt deer?
* Deer Hunters and Balance
* The Hunt for Answers
* Citizen Science on Deer Impacts in Upper Midwest

The Northwoods fight:

* Rush Logging Will Harm The Northwoods
*

Sep 9, 2020

Episode 59: What Jean Ossorio Has Learned (So Far) From 530 Nights In Wolf Country 

About Jean
Although Jean Ossorio wasn’t actually raised by wolves, she was taken to the Missouri woods for the first time at age six weeks. Her nature-loving parents met on a field trip. During childhood she accompanied them on annual camping expeditions to New Mexico and southern Colorado, falling in love with the Southwest and its native wildlife. After her parents retired to Silver City in 1971, she and her husband and daughter spent numerous holidays and summer vacations exploring New Mexico, especially the southwestern quadrant of the state.
Jean has spent over 530 nights tent camping in the Mexican wolf recovery area since 1998, and has seen 57 Mexican wolves in the wild. She served on the stakeholder panel of the 2003 Mexican Wolf Recovery Team, on Governor Richardson’s Catron County Wolf Task Force in 2005, and as a pre-release pen sitter for the Coronado Pack in 2013. She writes occasional features for the website, “Lobos of the Southwest” (also known as mexicanwolves.org), and gives frequent public outreach programs on the Mexican gray wolf.
Topics

* Some of Jean’s favorite sightings and interactions with Mexican Wolves
* Misconceptions about Mexican gray wolves
* Patience, luck, and happenstance: the art of seeing wolves in the wild

Extra Credit
Check out
MexicanWolves.org
Jean’s articles on MexicanWolves.org

* Remembering a Real-Life Super Wolf
* Tribute to an Old Lobo Friend: Dark Canyon AM992
* Obituary: First Wild Mexican Gray Wolf Foster Mom Dies
* Remembering Ernesta

Other Articles

* Defenders: Lucky Encounter
* Expmag: “Mexican wolves are hated, feared, and imperiled. Jean Ossorio, 75, has seen more of them than almost anyone.” Read more…

About Jean
Although Jean Ossorio wasn’t actually raised by wolves, she was taken to the Missouri woods for the first time at age six weeks. Her nature-loving parents met on a field trip. During childhood she accompanied them on annual camping expeditions to New Mexico and southern Colorado, falling in love with the Southwest and its native wildlife. After her parents retired to Silver City in 1971, she and her husband and daughter spent numerous holidays and summer vacations exploring New Mexico, especially the southwestern quadrant of the state.
Jean has spent over 530 nights tent camping in the Mexican wolf recovery area since 1998, and has seen 57 Mexican wolves in the wild. She served on the stakeholder panel of the 2003 Mexican Wolf Recovery Team, on Governor Richardson’s Catron County Wolf Task Force in 2005, and as a pre-release pen sitter for the Coronado Pack in 2013. She writes occasional features for the website, “Lobos of the Southwest” (also known as mexicanwolves.org), and gives frequent public outreach programs on the Mexican gray wolf.
Topics

* Some of Jean’s favorite sightings and interactions with Mexican Wolves
* Misconceptions about Mexican gray wolves
* Patience, luck, and happenstance: the art of seeing wolves in the wild

Extra Credit
Check out MexicanWolves.org
Jean’s articles on MexicanWolves.org

*

Aug 28, 2020

Episode 58: Tyus Williams On The Role That Diversity, Justice, and Equality Play In Winning The Tough Conservation Battles Ahead 

About
Tyus Williams is a Wildlife Ecologist currently working with The University of Nevada Reno as a field ecologist. He went to school at the University of Georgia where he studied fisheries and wildlife science. After performing his undergraduate thesis on jaguars in Belize he is now pursuing graduate school in the interest of carnivore ecology and spatial analysis.
Topics

* Why fixing the equality and social justice problem is key to winning big conservation battles.
* The need for better science funding.
* The facts of incremental change vs. running out the clock. Will we make it in time?
* Dealing with the onslaught of racial anxiety and social unrest as a black wildlife ecologist.

Extra Credit

*
Follow Tyus on Twitter

Tyus Recommends:

* ACLU
* NAACP
* Atlanta Community Food Bank
* Defenders of Wildlife
* Human Rights Campaign
* Backyard Basecamp
* Outdoor Afro
* Panthera

About
Tyus Williams is a Wildlife Ecologist currently working with The University of Nevada Reno as a field ecologist. He went to school at the University of Georgia where he studied fisheries and wildlife science. After performing his undergraduate thesis on jaguars in Belize he is now pursuing graduate school in the interest of carnivore ecology and spatial analysis.
Topics

* Why fixing the equality and social justice problem is key to winning big conservation battles.
* The need for better science funding.
* The facts of incremental change vs. running out the clock. Will we make it in time?
* Dealing with the onslaught of racial anxiety and social unrest as a black wildlife ecologist.

Extra Credit

* Follow Tyus on Twitter

Tyus Recommends:

* ACLU
* NAACP
* Atlanta Community Food Bank
* Defenders of Wildlife
* Human Rights Campaign
* Backyard Basecamp
* Outdoor Afro
* Panthera

Aug 10, 2020

Episode 57: The Magic Of Rewilding In Gorongosa National Park With Paola Bouley 

About
Paola grew up in South Africa, completed her academic training in the US, and is now based full-time in Mozambique.  She’s an ecologist and conservationist dedicated to the recovery of large carnivores and their co-existence with human communities in the Gorongosa Ecosystem of Central Mozambique.
In May of 2012 Paola co-founded
Projecto Leões da Gorongosa, directing research, capacity-building and strategic conservation efforts focused on large carnivores in partnership with the Park’s scientific, conservation and senior management teams.
Academic summary: B.S. in Biology (2001) at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and M.S. in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology (2005) at the Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, San Francisco State University.  Currently pursuing a PhD in Wildlife Management at University of Pretoria with Dr. Michael Somers focused on the ecological and social aspects of post-war recovery of large carnivores in Central Mozambique.
Topics

* Conservation is a crisis discipline.
* Painted wolves reintroduced and thriving.
* Gorongosa National Park has the “best lions ever!” according to Paola.
* Elephant, Pangolins, Leopards, Waterbuck. Learn about an amazing park exploding with wildlife!

Extra Credit

* Check Out The Wildlife Of Gorongosa National Park! 
* “The wild experiment to bring apex predators back from the brink” – Wired Magazine
* WildCam Gorongosa
* A Rewilding Success Story in Gorongosa National Park

Watch for: A PBS feature that will air in late 2020 focused on return of Painted Wolves to Gorongosa
Transcript
Download Episode 57 Paola Bouley show transcript. (PDF)
About
Paola grew up in South Africa, completed her academic training in the US, and is now based full-time in Mozambique.  She’s an ecologist and conservationist dedicated to the recovery of large carnivores and their co-existence with human communities in the Gorongosa Ecosystem of Central Mozambique.
In May of 2012 Paola co-founded Projecto Leões da Gorongosa, directing research, capacity-building and strategic conservation efforts focused on large carnivores in partnership with the Park’s scientific, conservation and senior management teams.
Academic summary: B.S. in Biology (2001) at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and M.S. in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology (2005) at the Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, San Francisco State University.  Currently pursuing a PhD in Wildlife Management at University of Pretoria with Dr. Michael Somers focused on the ecological and social aspects of post-war recovery of large carnivores in Central Mozambique.
Topics

* Conservation is a crisis discipline.
* Painted wolves reintroduced and thriving.

Jul 31, 2020

Episode 56: Kathleen Fitzgerald on African Wildlife Conservancies and the State of Wildlife Protection Funding During the Pandemic 

About Kathleen
Kathleen is a conservation leader recognized for her extensive experience in integrated large landscape conservation and development programs in Africa and North America. Kathleen has lived in Africa for 12 years. She was a senior staff member of the
African Wildlife Foundation for 11 years, most recently serving as Vice President for East and Southern Africa. She also serves as a member of the Rewilding Leadership Council.
She now leads Conservation Capital’s Business Consulting Africa division focusing on increasing revenue for protected area management and wildlife conservation. She serves as Senior Conservation Advisor to AWF.
Kathleen has helped create new conservation areas, improve management of protected areas, established innovative public, private partnerships and led community conservation initiatives. She managed climate mitigation and adaptation programs and completed dozens of land transactions in North America and Africa.

Topics

* Challenging times for parks and conservancies in Africa who depend primarily or completely on tourism dollars to fund rangers and programs meant to protect African widlife and landscapes.
* Innovating funding ideas to broaden parks and conservancies’ funding sources.
* What’s really behind all the neat photos of lions lying in the middle of the road and the seeming break that wildlife is getting during the pandemic?
* How you can help support African wildlife conservancies and parks.

Extra Credit
The Maasai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association (MMWCA) is a Kenyan commitment, to conserve the greater Maasai Mara ecosystem, through a network of protected areas (conservancies and conservation areas).
Conservation Capital develops financial and business driven solutions to support the world’s most important conservation areas.
About Kathleen
Kathleen is a conservation leader recognized for her extensive experience in integrated large landscape conservation and development programs in Africa and North America. Kathleen has lived in Africa for 12 years. She was a senior staff member of the African Wildlife Foundation for 11 years, most recently serving as Vice President for East and Southern Africa. She also serves as a member of the Rewilding Leadership Council.
She now leads Conservation Capital’s Business Consulting Africa division focusing on increasing revenue for protected area management and wildlife conservation. She serves as Senior Conservation Advisor to AWF.
Kathleen has helped create new conservation areas, improve management of protected areas, established innovative public, private partnerships and led community conservation initiatives. She managed climate mitigation and adaptation programs and completed dozens of land transactions in North America and Africa.

Topics

* Challenging times for parks and conservancies in Africa who depend primarily or completely on tourism dollars to fund rangers and programs meant to protect African widlife and landscapes.
* Innovating funding ideas to broaden parks and conservancies’ funding sources.
* What’s really behind all the neat photos of lions lying in the middle of the road and the seeming break that wildlife is getting during the pandemic?
* How you can help support African wildlife conservancies and parks.

Extra Credit
The

Jul 22, 2020

Episode 55: Kurt Menke On The Importance of GIS Mapping To Successful Rewilding Projects 

About Kurt
A former archaeologist, Kurt Menke is a geospatial generalist based in Albuquerque. He founded Bird’s Eye View to apply his expertise with GIS technology towards solving the world’s mounting ecological, economic and social issues. His areas of focus are public health, conservation and education. Kurt has a broad skill set. He is a spatial analyst, cartographer, web map developer, trainer/teacher and author.
He is also one of the newest members of the Rewilding Leadership Council. Kurt has been involved in myriad conservation mapping projects, including one we talk about today, the very successful Tijeras Canyon wildlife passage. We start with a bit of background before we really geek out on the vital importance of mapping to rewilding projects around the world.
Topics

* Why mapping is crucial to the vision and success of any rewilding project
* How good maps are worth many thousands of words when it comes to depicting on-the-ground elements important to reconnecting and protecting habitat and species
* The successful Tijeras Canyon wildlife passage project
* Kurt’s favorite “back of a napkin” map by Dave Foreman

Extra Credit

* Visit Kurt at
Bird’s Eye View GIS and on Twitter
* Read more about Kurt’s background on his Rewilding Leadership Council page

About Kurt
A former archaeologist, Kurt Menke is a geospatial generalist based in Albuquerque. He founded Bird’s Eye View to apply his expertise with GIS technology towards solving the world’s mounting ecological, economic and social issues. His areas of focus are public health, conservation and education. Kurt has a broad skill set. He is a spatial analyst, cartographer, web map developer, trainer/teacher and author.
He is also one of the newest members of the Rewilding Leadership Council. Kurt has been involved in myriad conservation mapping projects, including one we talk about today, the very successful Tijeras Canyon wildlife passage. We start with a bit of background before we really geek out on the vital importance of mapping to rewilding projects around the world.
Topics

* Why mapping is crucial to the vision and success of any rewilding project
* How good maps are worth many thousands of words when it comes to depicting on-the-ground elements important to reconnecting and protecting habitat and species
* The successful Tijeras Canyon wildlife passage project
* Kurt’s favorite “back of a napkin” map by Dave Foreman

Extra Credit

* Visit Kurt at Bird’s Eye View GIS and on Twitter
* Read more about Kurt’s background on his Rewilding Leadership Council page

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